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Muktinath Temple

Muktinath, the Lord of Salvation, is a holy place both for Buddhist and Hindu, which attracts thousands of devotees from Nepal, India, and Tibet every year. The Muktinath region, facing Mt. Nilgiri and Mt. Tilicho to the south-east, Dhaulagiri to the south-west and Thorang Peak and Yak Kawa Kang to the north, is a living museum of old villages, such as Dzar, Dzong, Khingga and Purang.

Muktinath, also known by Chumig Gyatsa (One Hundred Springs) is situated some 18-kilometres north-east of Jomsom. The Muktinath temple was constructed in 1815 A.D. by Queen Subarna Prabha, the wife of Rana Bahadur Saha, king of Nepal after she had a dream. The main temple is built in a Tibetan pagoda style containing a huge brass image of Chenrezig, in Buddhist, or Vishnu as Hindus call him.

Nearby is another temple, where gushes out of rock considered very holy. There is also a Buddhist monastery (Salamebar Dolamebar monastery) in the eastern corner of the Muktinath precinct; dedicated to Jwala Mai, the goddess of fire, shielded by curtains, are burning eternal flames. Hindus believe the flame, to be Agni, the god of fire. 

There are two other sites of worship within a single structure nearby; the Shiva-Parvati temple and a Narsingha gonpa (Monastery). The lower storey is the gompa, while the upper floor is the temple. At the back of the temple are 108-waterspouts, Chu-Mig-Gya-Tsa, fashioned in the shape of boar’s heads, the boar is one of the ten incarnations of Chenrezig (Buddhist) / Vishnu (in Hindu). This water is channelled from a spring above the temple. For Hindus, the importance of Muktinath, besides its holy water, lies in the belief that Lord Vishnu takes the form of saligrams. Saligrams are fossils found in the Kali Gandaki River, just an hour’s walking down from Muktinath. The traditional caretakers of Muktinath are Buddhist nuns.


For a private trip to Muktinath, please, let us know at annatreks@gmail.com. Please, detail your interest and requirement, The Muktinath is on the way while taking Round Annapurna Circuit Trek, Upper Mustang Trek and Muktinath Trek.

At the back of the temple are 108-waterspouts, Chu-Mig-Gya-Tsa, fashioned in the shape of boar’s heads, the boar is one of the ten incarnations of Chenrezig (Buddhist) / Vishnu (in Hindu)”