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Kathmandu Durbar Square

Kathmandu Durbar Square, the old palace complex exhibits the multitude of temples and palaces. The main attractions are the Gaddi Baithak Durbar, a Palace constructed in the Rana style in 1908, Basantapur Durbar, the main building of the old royal palace, Kumari Chowk, the residence of the Living Goddess and Kumari Bahal, where the family of Kumari resides.

Some two hundred years ago, a Western visitor wrote that there were as many temples as there were houses and many idols as there were people, in the city.

Indeed, Kathmandu boasts one of the largest assemblages of magnificent historical monuments and shrines ever built. Duly recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, Kathmandu Durbar Square lies in the heart of the city. Locally, it is also called Hanuman Dhoka Palace Square. The fascinating part of this Palace complex is the towering Nine Storey Palace, overlooking the beautiful cityscape and the vast Basantapur Square. In the 1768 A.D., King Prithivi Narayan Shah build a mansion to commemorate his conquest of the Valley is known for intricately carved wooden doors, roof struts, and massive lattice windows full of mythical figures.

Some of the famous monuments to be seen here are:

  • Taleju Temple: The tallest of all structures built by king Mahendra Malla in 1549 A.D.
  • Jagannath temple: Build in the 16th century and known for the fascinating carvings of erotic figures in the wooden struts’ eaves.
  • Kaal Bhairav: One of the gigantic stone idols in Kathmandu representing the terrifying aspects of Shiva.
  • Statue of King Pratap Malla: The statue in praying gesture to Digu Taleju the royal family deity
  • Kumari Ghar: The 17th century Kumari temple, an example of the highly developed Nepalese temple craft.
  • The Kasthamandap: The earthquake of 2015 destroyed Kasthamandap and it is under rebuilding. It is said to build from the timber of a single tree. It is believed the name Kathmandu is derived from Kasthamandap.

Ason Bazaar is an old city centre and market, where one can see and experience a bit of what the Nepalese use in their daily life. Ason can be visited on the way while walking or Rikshaw to Basantpur or at the end of the tour.

Some two hundred years ago, a Western visitor wrote that there were as many temples as there were houses and many idols as there were people, in the city”