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About Tibet

For many centuries the Tibet Autonomous Region remained a distant world for westerners guarded by the mighty Himalayas and in some cases forbidden to enter. Only a handful of people managed to reach in disguise, breaching the country’s harsh landscapes and snowy mountain barriers. Those who been able to return came with stories of exotic and intriguing land and monastic cities and brought the life stories of nomads grazing huge herds of yaks, monks spending years in meditation and pilgrims prostrating vast distances to achieve their religious goals.

Though the historical account that they brought was limited to Lhasa, the capital city, and around since the size of the country was massive and unable to travel alone or two. Tibet is the enormous land, in south-western China, with an area of 1.22 million square kilometres, and it borders with Kashmir regions, Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Yunnan, Sichuan, Qinghai, Uigur and Xinjiang Autonomous Regions.

The land was inhabited as early as in the late Palaeolithic Age, and today it is a home of more than 30 ethnic groups, including Lhoba, Hui, Han, Mongol, Monba, Naxi and Nu and among them the Tibetan population account 92.2% of the total population.

In recent years Tibet has enjoyed many changes, including in its capital city Lhasa. The rapidity of modernization is beyond the imagination with railway links, international flights, comfortable hotel, internet, medical facilities, modernization in agriculture and education.  Still, its staggeringly rich, and easily misunderstood, culture and cultural life remains resilient and continues a visiting here every time much exciting and mysterious.  And a journey to the Roof of the World is every day more comfortable and rewarding for today’s travellers.

The most accessible and most visited areas in Tibet are Tsetang, Tibet’s former capitals and relatively low altitude city full of ancient histories and monuments, the Lhasa, Gyantse, Shigatse and then the Mount Everest Base Camp, the north face of Everest, and the most sacred mountain on earth, the Mount Kailash. And the Shannan, Ngari, Nyingchi, Nagchu and Amdo are some the Tibetan domains and attract many tourists because of unique and colourful local customs, ancient monasteries and fascinating geography.

The most accessible and most visited areas in Tibet are Tsetang, Tibet’s former capitals and relatively low altitude city full of ancient histories and monuments, the Lhasa, Gyantse, Shigatse and then the Mount Everest Base Camp, the north face of Everest, and the most sacred mountain on earth, the Mount Kailash”